An experiment to find the heat fusion of water using a calorimeter

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An experiment to find the heat fusion of water using a calorimeter

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An experiment to find the heat fusion of water using a calorimeter

By knowing the masses of the ice, the water, and the calorimeter, and the resulting temperature change after the ice melts, the latent heat of fusion of ice is found.

The heat added, Q. In these cases, the added heat causes a change in phase to occur. Two common changes in phase are from solid to liquid and from liquid to gas.

The amount of heat required to accomplish a phase change is called the heat of transformation. More specifically, for a solid to liquid phase change, it is referred to as the heat of fusion; and for a liquid to gas phase change, the heat of vaporization. In this experiment, an ice cube of mass mt, assumed to be at 0oC, is placed in a calorimeter containing a mass of water rnw.

After the ice cube melts, the temperature of the system is T2. When the heat lost is equated to the heat gained, and the resulting equation solved for the latent heat of fusion L, the result is 3 where cw is the specific heat of water 4. In order to calculate the heat of fusion of ice from 3it is necessary to first determine the water equivalent of the calorimeter.

The value mccc is found by mixing known quantities of warm water and cool water in the calorimeter. Suppose the Calorimeter contains a mass of warm water mww, at temperature Tw.

An experiment to find the heat fusion of water using a calorimeter

If a mass of ool water mcw, at temperature Tc is mixed with the warm water in the calorimeter. Heat transfers can be further minimized by removing the cork stopper from the calorimeter only when necessary and only for a short time.

Compensation is made for the heat losses -or gains that inevitably occur. By starting the calorimeter and contents at a temperature above room temperature, the heat loss to the environment by the warm water is offset by the heat gained by the cool water or ice that is added to the calorimeter.

An attempt is also made to produce a final equilibrium temperature at or close to room temperature. The Calorimeter Find the mass of the empty calorimeter with the oC thermometer inserted in the cork.

Refer to Figure 1. Obtain water from the tap that is approximately 10 oC above room temperature. Wait for thermal equilibrium to be established, then record the temperature, Tw.

Find the mass of the calorimeter with the warm water. Cool some water in a container with crushed ice until its temperature is approximately 10 Co below room temperature.

Wait for thermal equilibrium and record the equilibrium temperature T. Find the mass of the calorimeter with the added.

Calculate the water equivalent of the calorimeter from equation 4 using the data collected in steps a through d. If the value of the water equivalent is negative, then carefully repeat steps a through d until a positive value is obtained.

Wait for thermal equilibrium and record the temperature T1. Find the mass of the calorimeter witti the warm water. Dry an ice cube and add it to the water.

Be sure to agitate the water to ensure the complete melting of the ice cube. Continue to add "dried" ice cubes until the final temperature is at or near room temperature.where c w anf c c are the specific heat capacity of water, resp.

of the material from which the inner container of the calorimeter is made, and m w a m c is the mass of water, resp. of . You will find the specific heat of a metal by equating the heat lost by the metal (at high temperature) to the heat gained by the water reservoir at a lower temperature when they are mixed in the calorimeter.

Feb 23,  · What assumption did we make about heat lost by the water in the calorimeter as compared to heat gained by the melting ice? AND Extension: Design an experiment to find out if an ice cube taken from a freezer and immediately placed into a calorimeter needs the same amount of energy per gram for melting as does an ice Status: Resolved.

William Meighan. Hour 1. Purpose: The purpose of this lab was to find the heat of fusion of ice using a simple calorimeter. Procedure: Approximately mL of tap water were heated in a mL beaker with a Bunsen burner to a temperature of 50°C.

Feb 07,  · I'm taking a first year physics course and our upcoming lab is an experiment to determine the Heat of fusion for ice. There are a few questions that I have. mA is the mass of the reservoir and stirrer (aluminum) c is the speci c heat of water cA is the speci c heat of the (aluminum) reservoir q is.

William Meighan. Hour 1. Purpose: The purpose of this lab was to find the heat of fusion of ice using a simple calorimeter. Procedure: Approximately mL of tap water were heated in a mL beaker with a Bunsen burner to a temperature of 50°C.

Experimental determination of Specific Heat of Water — Collection of Experiments